Trello on an upbeat modeNew York-based project management service, Trello, is surprisingly being used by 10m users globally, and has added another feather to its cap with 120,000 new users signing up every week, according to CEO Michael Pryor.

The co-founder of the software company seems perplexed when he ponders on how the app is being used, and states that users use it to chalk out a strategy for their weddings and holidays. This outstanding achievement has been met through wide engagement along with improved productivity and collaboration.

Trello is one of the rapidly evolving productivity apps right now, and empowers workers in a similar way as was once done by Microsoft Office.

How does Trello Work?

Trello has an enticing visual clarity to communication, collaboration and a whole lot of other things similar to other apps like Sunrise, Wunderlist, Wrike and Slack to name a few. The design of the application has a close resemblance to a whiteboard. The adroit design allows users to move the cards around the screen with the objective of keeping everyone updated with respect to the plans and projects.

The Emergence of Trello

They say necessity is the mother of invention, and Trello was born out of a dire need when Pryor and Joel Spolsky, co-founder of the company were working on their maiden software firm Fog Creek.

Pryor reminisces on the days when the two of them were thinking about new products and the problems that were haunting them, especially the difficulties faced by their company. There were many employees engaged, but the co-founders were trying to build strategies to have an idea on how things were working. At that time, this seemed to be an impossible task since they were using many different tools.

Pryor states that since Fog Creek was a software company with software engineers who were moving notes around their whiteboards, the idea of creating a web-based project management app stemmed out of it. The next step for these tech hunks was to segregate the visual metaphor and incorporate it into the software. By doing so, everyone within the company would get a perspective on what the team was up to.

Trello was finally revealed at a Tech Crunch event in 2011. In the same year, San Francisco-based magazine, Wired, labeled it as “The 7 Coolest Startups You Haven’t Heard of Yet” while Lifehacker stated that the app makes project collaboration easy and an enjoyable experience. Within a year following its launch, Trello boasted of a strong customer base with roughly 500k users.

Pryor talks about Trello and the future of productivity in this short video:

According to Pryor, the rapidly growing app is gaining wide popularity even outside the US and since users love it so much, it is spreading by word of mouth.

Since people from diverse backgrounds use Trello, the next stage is to integrate it with other tools like Salesforce, Google Docs or Slack, says Pryor. He concludes by saying that people these days are more into tablets, Smartphones and other devices and this accessibility indicates that the company should start with collaboration first and add productivity to that later on.

Trello raised a whooping sum of $10.3m in funding from companies like Spark and Index Ventures in 2014. The tool was recently launched in France, Spain, Germany and Brazil.